10 Quotes on a Twenty-Somethings’ Journey to Finding Home

Home can mean different things. It can be a Lerato for rent condo, a suite in Holiday Inn, or a villa in Quezon City.

Whatever it is, different things make us feel that we are homeSometimes, we feel that home is where we spent our childhood. It can also be where we found our partner or where we forged friendships. But because of time and the winds of change, we are forced to leave the place we love and a new one.

If you’ve been away from home for some time and you don’t know where it is anymore, here are some quotes that describe how it feels to leave home in your twenties and come back again.

 

  1. The moment you left your humble home for a rental.

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“After you leave home, you may find yourself feeling homesick, even if you have a new home that has nicer wallpaper and a more efficient dishwasher than the home in which you grew up.” 

– Lemony Snicket

 

 

  1. When you’re denying you aren’t lonely but deep down want to come back.

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“Home is not where you live but where they understand you.” 

– Christian Morgenstern

 

  1. The inner-battle of self-sacrifice and freedom.

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“I used to dream about escaping my ordinary life, but my life was never ordinary. I had simply failed to notice how extraordinary it was. Likewise, I never imagined that home might be something I would miss.”

― Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

 

  1. When you decided to not return to the place where you don’t have to pay rent and mortgage because you found “home” in your significant other’s arms.

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“Home wasn’t a set house, or a single town on a map. It was wherever the people who loved you were, whenever you were together. Not a place, but a moment, and then another, building on each other like bricks to create a solid shelter that you take with you for your entire life, wherever you may go.”

― Sarah Dessen, What Happened to Goodbye

 

  1. But your relationship didn’t last long, and going home feels like the only way to ease your heartache.

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“The desire to go home is the desire to be whole, to know where you are, to be the point of intersection of all the lines drawn through all the stars, to be the constellation-maker and the center of the world, that center called love. To awaken from sleep, to rest from awakening, to tame the animal, to let the soul go wild, to shelter in darkness and blaze with light, to cease to speak and be perfectly understood.”

― Rebecca Solnit, Storming the Gates of Paradise: Landscapes for Politics

 

  1. Fortunately, it’s perfectly fine to come back.

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“The ache for home lives in all of us. The safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.”

― Maya Angelou, All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes

 

  1. Besides the hardships of being a twenty-something from career, dating to finances, don’t lose hope.

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“Home isn’t a place, it’s a feeling.”

― Cecelia Ahern, Love, Rosie

 

  1. You still have your parents, relatives and supportive friends. Chin up and live in the moment. You still have a lot of time ahead of you.

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“Well, sometimes home is a person.”

― Beth Revis, A Million Suns

 

  1. The right person will come to sweep you off your feet and accept you for who you are. This person will make a home out of nothing and will make it seem that every place, as long as you are together, is home.

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“Home is the nicest word there is.”

― Laura Ingalls Wilder

 

  1. He or she will tame your rebel heart and make you see you and your family’s worth in your life. It will make you understand what home really is.

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“I don’t care if we have our house, or a cliff ledge, or a cardboard box. Home is wherever we all are, together,”

― James Patterson

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What You Need to Know When House Hunting

Make things easier with a checklist. Whether you are looking at bungalows in a subdivision in Bulacan or a townhouse in Quezon City, narrowing your options when choosing your next abode will make the selection process easier and quicker.

When house hunting, buyers often focus on the exterior and interior design rather than the functionality of the structure. Others prioritize the price of the house and lot because of the economic and financial aspects. Having a checklist will help balance what’s important and what is necessary.

It’s easy to get swept by the newest trends in architecture and real estate. House agents and brokers can be very persuasive. With a checklist in hand, you can stay right on track. Below are few pointers to guide you in completing the list.

 

Source of electricity

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Electricity and gas should be the first thing on your list. Some important questions to answer are:

  • How many sockets are in each room? Are there conveniently positioned?
  • Do all electrical sockets work?
  • Are there any interferences to electricity sources?
  • What alternative sources can you use in case the main power goes off?

If all of these are answered clearly by the seller or agent then it’s worth to consider the house. But other than the central electricity source, it’s worth noting how gas can be utilized in the space. Where can you store the gas cylinder? Does the house rely on LPG or petroleum to run the central heating? Is the heating system working properly? These things are equally important as they can also save your wallet.

 

Water source and plumbing

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When you are planning to move to an area with a limited supply of water, ask where the water came.

Live in a place that is comfortable, not worry about water rotations and rationing. Do some research and survey the area if their supply is stable. It may not be an issue now, but it can be in the future. Look years ahead before settling in a location.

As soon as you find no interruption with water supply, check the plumbing. Inspect the fixtures and pipes for noises, leaks and weak spots. Rusty pipes and fixtures are more likely to appear in aged houses, so pry the previous homeowner of the house’s history. Consulting a professional plumber for a second opinion is also advisable.

Hot water and bathtubs are additional features in Filipino homes, but newly-built houses often have these. Make sure the water heater still works properly and is connected to all water lines. The bathtub shouldn’t be clogged and the bathroom should be well-ventilated. It better to have a bathroom with a window. If that isn’t the case, choose one with an exhaust fan.

 

Lot and Surrounding Area

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Take into consideration the land area of your property – yard and side gutter included. The house might check everything on the list but if the gutters and drains are clogged, just forget it. It may cost you more because you did not consider the water damages caused by the blocked waterways.

If you’re on the scrimping side, consider the spread of the yard and the garden work. The lot may have a landscape that is high maintenance. The yard may have expensive turf that needs water more than your family does. Do you really need those? Think about it.

When scouring the exteriors, watch out for signs of decay and rot in woodwork.

Consequently, the surrounding area and neighborhood play a huge part in your everyday life. Living close to the places you frequent (school and work place) and facilities like hospitals, banks, and retail stores make life easier.

Communities accessible through different modes of transportation are much ideal than places exclusive for private vehicles. Best of all, choose a location that fits you and your family’s lifestyle.

Remember, a safe community is always a priority.

If you’ve been to a couple of houses visits, take note of the details that fit the details listed above. The next time you view a house, bring the list and compare if they have the potential to be your new home. Buying a property is a decision that should be hastened, so come with an open mind, inspect the structure thoroughly and compare your notes. Do not hesitate to ask questions about the house. Most of all, trust your judgment on deciding the perfect home.