Moving 101: Five Ways to Prepare Your Kids for a Move

Playing with boxes

“Moving to a new place is like starting a new life; nobody knows who you are so it is like a new beginning for you. A fresh start.” –Author Unknown

 

Moving can be a double-edged sword—especially for kids who are too young to understand why the transition and why it is necessary.

It can be both an exciting and frustrating prospect for the family. But, it can also be an avenue for understanding by explaining to your kids what the move is about and why you need to do it. Do not be surprised though, the moment you announce your plans, you will inevitably be met with a barrage of questions.

“But what about my friends? What about my bed?”

“What about my school?”

These are the sort of questions you can expect once they see you packing and sorting household items. Indulge their curiosity but be honest in doing so. Whether you are relocating to Ametta Place in order to expand your family or downsizing your home to make up for your finances, make it clear to them why the move is essential. Expectedly, you are going to be met with a lot of protests as well as resistance. After all, when your kids have spent a reasonable chunk of their childhood in your previous home, they are likely to get exponentially attached to it (and its respective memories) over the years.

However, you can always opt to mitigate this occurrence by gently easing your children to the idea of the move. Do not immediately tell them about your moving plans or even the fact that you are transferring houses the moment you decide upon it or else you will have to endure days or even weeks of tears and repetitive questions.
In any case, if you are planning that big move, here are some things you might want to know before telling them about the move:

1.) Have a plan

Before letting your children know about the move, consider having a plan as to how you and your spouse would broach the subject. Explain it to them in terms that they would be able to comprehend. If you are looking to cut down expenses, they would certainly not understand that. Instead, talk about how the move is necessary because you need money for their school, meals and the like. Moreover, tell them that their toys and all your personal belongings can come with you but how the floor, lights, windows, etc., cannot. In the same regard, let them know that your house will have a new family who will love it just the same.

2.) Involve the kids

To ease your kids into the idea of the move, have them help you with the things you need to do prior to the move. Ask them to help you pack and likewise, give them a role when it comes to house hunting. Show them all the potential houses you have considered, let them tag along on viewings and ask them for opinions on the new home. Moreover, it is imperative that you ask them what they like and dislike about the new home. Once you have finally chosen a place to settle in, be sure to have some time to explore the neighborhood with your kids.

3.) Be positive

No matter how sound the move might be (or how strong your resolve about it is), you will inescapably encounter some misgivings that might cause you to think twice about your decision. Of course, after living in your old home for quite a while, you would come to think about the things and aspects you once loved about it. You have put so much into it that it can be rather hard to leave. While these are sentiments you can choose to tell your kids, make sure to end your spiel on a high note. Do not make them feel as if you are unsure about the move and make the overall vibe ooze with positivity and confidence. Remember, if you wavered on your decision and worried about it, your kids will know.

4.) Save memories

Whenever possible, try to take a piece of your old house with you and incorporate this into your new house. This can be in the form of an old door, windows or the like. In this way, your children would feel as if an element of your old home is still present in your new one and would adjust better to your new home. However, if you do not have an actual physical piece that you can save, then at least take a myriad of photos of your old home which you would then collate and turn into a scrapbook. Let your children take their own photos as well. Photos are not limited to the house. It can include anything important from the school, friends, and other places in the neighborhood as well.

5.) Maintain your routine

Routines are important—, especially to your younger kids. It gives them a feeling of familiarity and a semblance of their old life. With this in mind, maintain the typical patterns you once had in your old home and regularly do them (as much as possible) before, during and after the move. This can involve anything from bedtime routines, library day, pancake Sundays to just about anything that would provide familiarity, comfort, and reassurance to your younger kids.

Image Source

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s